Oil Fields of the Texas-Louisiana Gulf Coastal Plain, Volume 8, Issue 282

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1906 - 146 pages
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Page 149 - Most of the above publications may be obtained or consulted in the following ways: 1. A limited number are delivered to the Director of the Survey, from whom they may be obtained, free of charge (except classes 2, 7, and 8), on application. 2. A certain number are delivered to Senators and Representatives in Congress, for distribution.
Page 123 - The channels of these ascending waters may have been in places of structural weakness, such as fissures, which probably at one time continued to the surface, but may have been sealed by the deposition of the later overlapping strata now capping the oil pools. Many facts may be adduced in support of this hypothesis, although it must be admitted that it presents some serious difficulties. The mode of accumulation of the enormous masses of rock salt which occur in the Louisiana Salt Islands, in Damon...
Page 79 - ... by, which show no traces of oil." The results of this investigation by Dr. Turner, while not absolutely conclusive, indicate that some other source for this oil must be sought than the diatoms. Since, as shown above, it is entirely improbable that the oil was derived from Beaumont by floating upon the surface of the water, the only other source assignable is from the underlying strata. It does not necessarily follow, even if this is the case, that this region is underlain by a commercial deposit...
Page 123 - The oil and salt pockets of the Texas Coastal Plain are probably not indigenous to the strata in which they are found, but are the resultant products of columns of hot saline waters which have ascended, under hydrostatic pressure, at points along lines of structural weakness, through thousands of feet of shale, sand, and marine littoral sediments of the Coastal Plain section, through which oil and sand are disseminated in more or less minute quantities.
Page 41 - Guffey well No. 1, on the extreme west side of the field, was sunk to a depth of 1 ,200 feet. A sputtering of gas, mud, and sand, with some oil, was noted at 900 feet. Similar indications were obtained in the Great Western well, in the Rodgers tract near the railroad. It was drilled to 1,500 feet in November of the same year. This well is also noteworthy for the large amount of hot water encountered (see p. 120). In March, 1902, the Great Western Company obtained a natural flow or gushing of oil...
Page 123 - The mode of accumulation of of the enormous masses of rock salt which occur in the Louisiana Salt Islands, in Damon Mound, in High Island, and also in Spindletop has never been satisfactorily explained. For a variety of reasons it does not seem possible that they can be the result of evaporation of sea water in natural salt pans, which is supposed to be the origin of most deposits of rock salt. It may therefore be necessary to...
Page 116 - ... The majority of geologists have held to the second theory, namely, that petroleum is derived from the organic matter disseminated through great masses of carbonaceous shales by the process of slow natural distillation at relatively low temperatures, and that it has subsequently migrated through the strata to the reservoirs in which it is found. In proof it is pointed out that these carbonaceous shales yield by artificial distillation a large quantity of hydrocarbons, both gaseous and liquid,...
Page 38 - ... supposed analogy with certain salines of Louisiana and eastern Texas, where the quaquaversal dip is marked, but where crustal deformation is manifestly far more intense than at this point. GAS. FROM ABOVE THE OIL. At almost all depths small showings of gas were encountered. Its appearance, even at the surface, has been noted under "Surface indications
Page 131 - A similar but softer pitch made by boiling the crude oil for twenty hours in an open dish had the following properties compared with a D grade residue or paving asphalt from Los Angeles oil: Character of residues of Beaumont and California oils. Richardson has called attention to the peculiar conditions under which the sulphur exists in the Beaumont petroleums and the probability of the presence of free sulphur which might account for the variability in character of the product obtained on varying...

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