Galapagos Wildlife

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Bradt Travel Guides, 2011 - 156 pages
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Traveling to the Galápagos to discover the unique flora and fauna that so captivated Darwin and the many that followed him is a rite of passage for serious wildlife enthusiasts. Written by two expert naturalists who are passionate about the Galápagos, this guide is packed with entertaining descriptions, while full-color photography aids in identifying key species both on land and below water. [HelenC1] Now with more detailed descriptions of island landing sites, more photos, and updated information on conservation efforts, Bradt's Galápagos Wildlife is the perfect companion for this once-in-a-lifetime trip. For those looking to explore it also includes unique island trail plans.

 

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Contents

An Introduction to the Galápagos
1
Habitats
7
Plants
15
Invertebrates
27
Reptiles
33
Birds
49
Mammals
83
The Seashore
93
Island Landings and Visitor Sites
109
Conservation
141
Glossary
150
Further Reading
152
Index
153
Main Endemin Species of the Galápagos
156
Back Cover
158
Copyright

Underwater
97

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About the author (2011)

Punta Suarez From the moment the dinghy heads to the rocky point you are spell-bound by surfing young sea lions, and a reception committee of their parents barking on the tiny beach. A promontory of wave-rounded boulders protects the landing from some of the biggest waves in the archipelago. Large marine iguanas lie motionless like sentinels upon the rocks - here more colorful than elsewhere with hues of red and green. First you walk South through dense saltbush then... the trail continues on through a colony of Nazca boobies at the western edge of the island. The trail dips down to an eroded pebble beach; tread carefully as marine iguanas nest here! A pair of oystercatchers can usually be heard as you step into their domain. All along the coast the distinctive red-billed tropic birds utter their screeching alarm call, and if you are lucky can spot them entering a cave where they nest. Boobies will keep a watchful eye for a Galápagos hawk that will pick off any chicks left unguarded. The lava lizards are bigger here than other islands, especially the black-spotted males and the mockingbirds also differ with longer bills and aggressive behaviour, e.g. perching on tourists' hats.

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